Final Report Summary – SAT-BBE (Systems Analysis Tools Framework for the EU Bio-Based Economy Strategy)

Final Report Summary – SAT-BBE (Systems Analysis Tools Framework for the EU Bio-Based Economy Strategy)

Main topic: REPORTS ON Models Tools
Document / search engine: Final Report Summary – SAT-BBE (Systems Analysis Tools Framework for the EU Bio-Based Economy Strategy)
Framework project: Systems Analysis Tools Framework for the EU Bio-Based Economy Strategy
Short name of the project:
Website link: https://www.wur.nl/en/project/sat-bbe.htm
CORDIS link if relevant: https://cordis.europa.eu/project/id/311880/reporting
Short description:

Key findings
First, the scope of the bioeconomy systems analysis tools framework has been defined using the relatively broad and generic definition of the EC (2012). Though not explicitly mentioned it is essential that the bioeconomy moves from a linear to a (more) circular economy and values non-market ecosystem services, and at the same time contributes to competitive opportunities of the concerned biobased sectors through innovation and technical change.

Second, a conceptual system analyses framework for the bioeconomy has been developed based on a supply-demand framework that connects the building blocks (drivers, impacts, responses) for analysing impacts, trade-off and synergy effects that go along with a transition to a biobased economy). The SAT-BBE consortium identified and analysed the most important interactions and feedback effects between the bioeconomy and other parts of the economy (e.g. fossil and energy based industries), taking into account developments in system drivers (e.g. economic development, innovation and technical change) and constraints (e.g. land, water, non-renewable natural resources, labour). Impacts are measured in relation to the five societal challenges of the EC Bioeconomy Strategy. In next steps, policy and strategic management responses can be implemented in order to influence the demand and supply system drivers for meeting the targets of the Bioeconomy Strategy and other policies.
Third, a systems analysis toolkit has been designed using existing data and model approaches. There is the need to consider multiple scales and dimensions when monitoring the evolution and impacts of the bioeconomy. Tools are classified in General and Partial Equilibrium models (GE and PE), bottom up approaches and Integrated Assessment Models. Detailed description of these tools, in terms of their main applications, insights, and their strengths and limitations with respect to the assessment of biomass supply and its societal impacts. A number of operational models that are potentially suitable to monitor and evaluate the bioeconomy and its trade-offs. Existing models are currently extended to include more bioeconomy sectors (e.g. MAGNET and Globiom).
Fourth, it can be concluded that no ‘super model’ exists (nor should be designed) that covers all societal challenges and multi-dimensional relationships in the bioeconomy. Each model has its specific strengths and weaknesses, which means that models needs to be linked in an operational, transparent and systematic way to monitor the evolution and impacts of the bioeconomy and to investigate impacts and potential trade-off and synergy effects, tailored to the specific aim of the analysis or policy question. Linking of models through ‘loose coupling’, instead of integration of modules, is a suitable option to further operationalize the SAT-BBE framework and toolkit and provides the flexibility to include models based on specific needs of the assessment.
Fifth, For each of the five societal challenges of the EC Bioeconomy Strategy the required data and models, as well as the gaps in available and required data and models. In general it can be concluded that data, indicators and models are fairly well established for traditional sectors of the bioeconomy (agriculture, fishery, forestry, food, paper and pulp, textile), but less for the innovative sectors (e.g. bioenergy and biochemicals) and less for specific aspects, such as land use, employment, soil quality, etc..


Countries/regions described/represented: Austria, Belgium, Croatia, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Denmark, Estonian, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Ireland, Italy, Latvia, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Malta, Poland, Portugal, Romania, Slovakia, Slovenia, Spain, Sweden, The Netherlands
Year: 2012